Our rope

Bexco is lean, adept niche player capable of manufacturing a made-to-measure synthetic rope to match and beat anyone in the industry We have a competent and experienced team of committed experts who can analyse a complex problem in order to provide a safe, economic and technically-competent synthetic rope that reliably offers a sustainable solution to any marine, offshore, industrial and renewables challenge on land or at sea.

Rope construction

  • Laid ropes

    The most common laid constructions are 3 and 4 strand ropes. For a typical design a good fibre strength and fatigue life will translate into acceptable properties in the rope. A laid rope will rotate under load, but the effect on the strength is limited.
  • Cross lay 6-strand ropes

    The most common laid constructions are 3 and 4 strand ropes. For a typical design a good fibre strength and fatigue life will translate into acceptable properties in the rope. A laid rope will rotate under load, but the effect on the strength is limited.
  • 8-strand plaited ropes

    Plaited ropes are sometimes described as square braids. They are produced on a plaiting machine containing eight reels, each containing one strand. 4 'S' and 4 'Z' twisted strands result in a torque balanced construction. Plaited ropes can be easily spliced and the twisted strands offer good resistance to abrasion.
  • 12-strand braided ropes

    12-strand ropes consist of 6 'S' and 6 'Z' strands. Because of its round shape, the rope is very stable on the winch and offers a better abrasion resistance due to greater surface contact. The rope does not rotate under load.
  • Ultraline

    The Ultraline design has been developed to give a rope extra protection against wear and tear without changing the primary characteristics significantly. This has been achieved by braiding a cover over the load bearing cores. The cover is optimised for wear and abrasion resistance and the cores are optimised for strength. _The cover is a Bexcoline braid that provides dimensional stability to the rope structure and protects the cores from external damage. The cover braid does not contribute to the strength of the rope.

Fibres

Conventional fibres

The most common materials used for fibre mooring lines are polyester, polyamide, polypropylene and polyethylene. Some ropes are made of combinations of these materials.

Polyester

Polyester is the most durable of the common materials. It has high strength, both wet and dry. It has good resistance against external abrasion and does not lose strength rapidly due to cyclic loading. Polyester has a low co-efficient of friction and a relatively high melting point (256°C).

Polyamide (Nylon)

Polyamide rope loses 10 - 15% of its strength when wet. It has the highest elasticity of regularly used materials with good temperature and abrasion resistance.

Polypropylene

Polypropylene rope has approximately the same elasticity as polyester rope. Polypropylene has limited temperature resistance and has poor cyclic loading characteristics. Prolonged exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays can cause polypropylene fibres to disintegrate due to actinic degradation.

Mixed Polyolefins

Mixed Polyolefins are bi-component fibres made of a blend during extrusion of polypropylene and polyethylene, offering a higher degree of resistance to abrasion and strength compared to regular polypropylene.

Polypropylene / Polyester melt mix

These fibres are a melt mixture of polyester and polypropylene during extrusion, with a higher strength than polypropylene.

Polyester / Polyolefin dual fibres

These yarns are made with polyester fibres covering a polyolefin core. Minimum breaking force, abrasion resistance and cyclic rope performance are equivalent to polyester.


High modules fibres

These fibres are much stronger than conventional synthetic fibres such as polyamide, polyester and polypropylene. Strength and elongation are similar to wire but due to the significantly lower weight, ropes made from these fibres are much lighter and easier to handle than any other type of rope.

Aramid fibres

Aramid fibres typically have high strength and low stretch. It does not creep and does not melt but chars at high temperatures. It is susceptible to axial compression but has very good fatigue properties (tension-tension fatigue life) Common trade names are Twaron®, Kevlar® and Technora®.

Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP)

Liquid Crystal Polymer fibres have high strength and low stretch and excellent resistance to creep and flex fatigue. The fibre has a temperature resistance between HMPE and Aramid (melting point of 300°C). LCP fibres have excellent long-term durability to fatigue, cutting and abrasion. Common trade name is Vectran®.

High modulus polyethylene (HMPE)

High Modulus Polyethylene is a fibre with a high strength per weight ratio and low stretch characteristics. HMPE fibres have very good fatigue and abrasion properties but limited temperature resistance, having a melting point of 147°C and a maximum continuous working temperature of 65°C. HMPE has good resistance to axial compression, a low coefficient of friction and good abrasion resistance. Common trade names are Dyneema® and Spectra®.